How To Adapt Your Bathroom If You Have Arthritis

In this post we explain 6 simple, low-cost measures that can be taken to help adapt your bathroom, making it easier and safer for you to use now and in the future.

How To Adapt Your Bathroom If You Have Arthritis
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    More than 10 million people are reported to suffer from Arthritis in the UK.

    Symptoms of Arthritis can include joint pain, stiffness and weakness. If you suffer from any of these symptoms, making a few minor adaptions to your home can make living with arthritis a much more comfortable experience.

    One room that causes particular difficulties to sufferers of arthritis can be the bathroom. This is mainly due to the increased risk of falls and accidents.

    In this post we explain 6 simple, low-cost measures that can be taken to help adapt your bathroom, making it easier and safer for you to use now and in the future.

    Top 6 Ways To Adapt Your Bathroom For Arthritis

    Adapt Your Bathroom If You Have Arthritis With Grabrails or Handrails

    1. Install Handrails

    In places where you need to steady your balance consider installing a hand rail (otherwise known as grab rail) could help.

    It is particularly important to install handrails where there is a change of level. For example steps leading to a bath, in the bath itself or sitting down on a toilet.

    2. Make Bathing Safer & Easier

    Sometimes a relaxing bath is just what you need. In fact, hot baths have been shown to have a number of benefits for sufferers of Arthritis. But, like so many other everyday activities, arthritis can make bathing difficult. This is where bath aids for Arthritis can help.

    Installing a bath lift can greatly help your safety when getting in and out of the bath. Bath lifts such as the AquaLift will gently lower you into the water from a comfortable seated position. When it’s time to get out, the AquaLift conveniently raises you level to the seat once more, so you can simply transfer out of the bath. This prevents you from putting too much pressure on your joints making bathing safer and easier for people who suffer from arthritis.

    There are other ways to make bathing easier too. Swap your slippery sponge for a long handled sponge or long-handled exfoliating brush. They can help you get to those hard to reach places without putting unnecessary strain on yourself.

    Top Tip– Always test the temperature of water before you get in the bath to avoid falling as you to try to avoid burning yourself in the hot water.

     

    “This equipment enables me to bathe easily & safely. It is a small & neat unit which fits easily into my small bathroom & the belt folds away to enable others to use the bath. I have bad Arthritis especially in my knees & it is of great benefit to me. At last I can have a nice relaxing bath! Very efficient & fast service. Everything done on time & with minimum disruption. Would recommend this company.”

    Mrs Joyce Timmins

    Create a More Accessible Space With Your Bathroom Accessories

    3. Create a More Accessible Space With Your Bathroom Accessories

    Think about the smaller elements of your bathroom too. A few simple updates to your bathroom accessories can help:

    Update Your Product Dispensers: For people who suffer from Arthritis, picking up heavy bottles, twisting open caps, using a bar of soap, or pressing difficult pumps, especially when wet and slippery, can be very difficult. Consider using product dispensers such as liquid soap to make usability easier. Or you could even take things one step further and purchase an automatic soap dispenser, similar to those found in public bathrooms, to make things even easier
    Upgrade Your Taps: Install lever taps and spatula handles on toilets, again especially if your hands and wrists are affected by arthritis
    Re-organise: Keep everything you need to use on a daily basis within easy reach rather than on high shelves to avoid any awkward stretching

    4. Raise Your Toilet Seat

    Arthritis can make it difficult to sit down or raise from your toilet seat.

    By adding a height adjustable toilet seat raiser you can normally raise the height of your toilet by up to 15cm.

    This will greatly help you sitting on and standing up from the toilet.

    Sizes, prices and safety mechanisms vary considerably so make sure you have assessed all options before making a decision.

    Adapt bathroom for arthritis with a raised toilet seat

    5. Add Non- Slip Mats

    Wet floors can be particularly hazardous, especially if you have arthritis and struggle with your agility.

    Investing in non-slip mats is a cheap and easy way to help with mobility around your bathroom.

    They can help to prevent slips and falls by providing traction for your feet when they are wet. Placing a slip mat inside and outside of your bath and shower is highly recommended.

    6. Get a Towel Warmer

    Cold air can really aggregate Arthritis, so getting out of your bath or shower when cold and wet can really be quite uncomfortable.

    Many Arthritis sufferers report that placing their towel on a towel warmer can be a real benefit. If you don’t have access to a towel warmer in your bathroom, putting your towel in the tumble dryer or in airing cupboard instead will also do the trick.

    Financial Help Available To Adapt Your Bathroom For Arthritis

    Those who suffer from Arthritis may be able to claim for some additional funding to help adapt your Bathroom for Arthritis:

    VAT Relief– Those who have a long term illness, such as those who suffer from Arthritis, can get 20% off the AquaLift Bath Lift- call us on 0800 028 2802 to find out more.
    Local Council– If you are on a limited income there are various grants, such as the Disabled Facilities Grant, that can be made available to you through your local council

    Rediscover the comfort of full-depth bathing!

    We hope applying these simple changes to your bathroom will make using your Bathroom easier.

    If you or someone you know suffers from Arthritis and would benefit from some help getting out of bathtub, as well as the relaxing warmth of a deep bath, AquaLift could make a real difference.

    Gently lowering you into the water from a comfortable seated position, when it’s time to get out, the AquaLift conveniently raises you level to the seat once more, so you can simply transfer out of the bath.

    If you would like to find out how the AquaLift could make life easier, a short phone call will bring a demonstration unit to your home. By appointment one of our trained advisors will carry out a full assessment of your bathroom and make sure the AquaLift is right for you.

    To find out more about how the AquaLift bath lift could make bath time easier, get in touch today. Call us on 0800 854 673 to find out more.

    About The Author

    Kim Atkinson

    Kim Atkinson

    Kim is a Digital Marketing specialist with 7 years of experience in the Homes & Mobility Sector.